Know Your Child's Risk

And What to Do

If your infant

Has Severe Eczema, Egg Allergy, or Both

If your infant

Has Mild to Moderate Eczema

If your infant

Has No Eczema or Any Food Allergy

Early Introduction

Because the ideal window for introducing peanut foods is small — and begins early — it’s critical to know your baby’s risk factors and plan in advance. Depending on your child’s risk, peanut foods should be introduced according to these guidelines after they’ve already started other solid foods.

Early Introduction

Early Introduction

Because the ideal window for introducing peanut foods is small — and begins early — it’s critical to know your baby’s risk factors and plan in advance. Depending on your child’s risk, peanut foods should be introduced according to these guidelines after they’ve already started other solid foods.

If your infant Has Severe Eczema, Egg Allergy, or Both

The new guidelines recommend talking with your doctor before giving them any peanut foods. Your healthcare provider might want to do an allergy test or introduce baby-friendly peanut foods under medical supervision. Once cleared, infants in this category should start eating peanut foods around 4-6 months of age and should continue to consume them regularly– 2g of peanut protein, three times per week.

If your infant Has Mild to Moderate Eczema

The new guidelines recommend feeding them small amounts of baby-friendly peanut foods, like peanut powder or thinned peanut butter, around three times a week starting when they are around 6 months old.

 

It is not necessary for parents of infants in this group to have an in-office evaluation in advance of introducing peanut foods.

If your infant Has No Eczema or Any Food Allergy

The new guidelines recommend introducing foods that contain peanuts together with other solid foods as often as you would like and in accordance with family preferences and cultural practices. Most children will fall into the low risk category.